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New University of Southern California Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences/Los Angeles Times Poll on the California Economy and Budget

Posted by GQRR Team on

usclatpollOn behalf of the  University of Southern California Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences and the Los Angeles Times, Greenberg Quinlan Rosner Research, in conjunction with American Viewpoint, conducted a new survey among 1,507 registered California voters.  The latest survey shows:

  • Make California Legislature part-time, poll majority says
  • Californians would rather ease penalties than pay more for prisons
  • Voters okay with ending redevelopment funds
  • California voters see some bright spots in grim budget
  • California households are doing without, Voters hesitant on farmworker proposal
  • Californians want to allow local taxes on cigarettes, other products
  • CA Voters Favor Early Release of Low-Level, Non-Violent Inmates
  • CA Voters Split on "Amazon Tax" on Online Purchases
  • 1 in 3 Californians have put off buying a home
  • Californians Favor Granting Local Governments New Taxing Powers

Key Findings

 
  • Governor Brown’s handling of the budget demonstrates a synchronicity with California voters - through a protracted budget battle with substantive outcomes that have left voters divided, Brown’s approval rating increased four points, to 48 percent. A 44 percent plurality think this year’s budget process went more smoothly than in the past few years - 31 percent say it went about the same and 14 percent believe it went less smoothly.
  • While California voters are somewhat willing to accept many spending cuts and fee increases as part of the deficit fix, there is large-scale rejection of the cuts to K-12 education that could result as a trigger if additional revenue does not materialize - only 33 percent find an automatically-triggered cut to K-12 education an acceptable measure to balance the budget.
  • When it comes to a court-mandated reduction of the prison population, California voters are much more open to several proposals that would put low-level, nonviolent offenders back on the street or transfer them to local custody than they are to raising taxes or further cutting vital services like education or health care to pay to keep people incarcerated.

 

Articles

July 20, 2011 - Make California Legislature part-time, poll majority says

July 20, 2011 - Californians would rather ease penalties than pay more for prisons

July 21, 2011 - Voters okay with ending redevelopment funds, poll finds

July 21, 2011 - California voters see some bright spots in grim budget

July 23, 2011 - California households are doing without

July 23, 2011 - Voters hesitant on farmworker proposal, poll finds

July 25, 2011 - Californians want to allow local taxes on cigarettes, other products

 

Read University of Southern California Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences releases:

July 20, 2011 - Poll: CA Voters Favor Early Release of Low-Level, Non-Violent Inmates

July 21, 2011 - Poll: CA Voters Split on "Amazon Tax" on Online Purchases

July 21, 2011 - Encuesta: Votantes en California favorecen la libertad anticipada de reos condenados por delitos menores no violentos

July 23, 2011 - Poll: 1 in 3 Californians have put off buying a home

July 23, 2011 - Encuesta: La Mitad de Hogares Latinos en California han Recortado Sus Gastos de Alimentos y Gasolina desde la Crisis de Viviendas

July 24, 2011 - Californians Favor Granting Local Governments New Taxing Powers

 

Methodology

Greenberg Quinlan Rosner Research, in conjunction with American Viewpoint, conducted this survey on behalf of the University of Southern California Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences and the Los Angeles Times.

 

These findings are based on a random sample survey of 1,507 registered voters in the state of California, conducted from July 6 - 17, 2011. Interviews were conducted by telephone using live interviewers from Interviewing Services of America. Voters were randomly selected from a list of registered voters statewide and reached on a landline or cell phone depending on the number they designated on their voter registration. Thirteen percent of this sample was reached on a cell phone. Up to five attempts were made to reach and interview each randomly selected voter. In order to examine distinctions and include a wider range of questions in this study, some questions were split into random half-samples, with one-half of 754 voters and the other half of 753 voters.

 

The study includes an oversample of Latino registered voters, for a total of 475 Latino voters interviewed. All interviews among known Latinos were carried out via telephone by bilingual Latino interviewers, and conducted in the preferred language of the survey respondent, English or Spanish. Overall, 35 percent of interviews among the known Latino sample were conducted in Spanish and 65 percent in English. The technique of using fully bilingual interviewers yields higher response and cooperation rates and is greatly preferred because it does not terminate calls with Spanish-language households and require a callback.

 

Upon completion of all interviewing, the results were weighted to bring the Latino oversample population into line with the racial and ethnic composition of registered voters in California. The data were weighted to reflect the total population of registered voters throughout the state, balancing on regional and demographic characteristics for gender, age, race, party registration and education according to known census estimates and voter file projections.

 

The maximum sampling error for the overall sample of 1,507 registered voters is +/- 2.52 percentage points at the 95 percent confidence level. The margin of error for the 475 Latino sample respondents is +/- 4.49 percentage points at the 95 percent confidence level.